Gone are the days when the sight of your cutlery in the open would invite a frown from the visiting guests — in fact, more and more people are opening up to the idea of open shelving. If you are looking to contrast your new kitchen from the old one (or your grandma’s) and add a sense of ‘largeness’ to your space, you should definitely try open shelving.
Take advantage of unused areas in your kitchen. Toe-kick storage located beneath cabinet doors, for example, is a creative place to store items that aren't used on a daily basis, like serveware, linens, or a spare step ladder. Maximizing your kitchen's floor plan to find additional storage opportunities will also help keep your countertops free of clutter.
Major remodels involve a larger overhaul of the existing kitchen than minor remodels. Key fixtures—lighting, appliances and flooring—are replaced with new versions, while extra touches are added such as a high-end sink with matching faucet and semi-custom cabinetry. Semi-custom cabinets are customizable, with versatile sizing and door front options.

When designing your new kitchen, consider creative ways to transform traditional pieces, like cabinets, into something functional and unique. For example, a standalone hutch made from Martha Stewart Living PureStyle cabinetry can not only serve as storage, but also transform into a handy reminder station with the addition of dry-erase board inserts.


Ready to assemble (RTA) kitchen cabinets come in a flat pack along with all the hardware needed for assembly. One of the biggest advantages of RTA kitchen idea is that it saves you a substantial cost on labor charges thereby allowing you extra room to spend on quality products. At the bottom of the price list are medium density fiberboard (MDF). Also known as engineered wood, substrate, hardboard, etc., they are all made by pressing wood particles together at high temperature with glue. While being an affordable option, it’s durability is often compromised.
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