If you want more counter and storage space, then adding a center island may be worth the cost. But an island can limit the number of people working in the kitchen, reduce traffic flow to one-way with no passing, and make for cramped quarters. Try out an island before committing to one. Slap together a full-scale model out of cardboard or plywood and live with it for a few days. Make sure you can open your stove and refrigerator doors. No space for an island? Consider a kitchen trolley instead.
Major remodels involve a larger overhaul of the existing kitchen than minor remodels. Key fixtures—lighting, appliances and flooring—are replaced with new versions, while extra touches are added such as a high-end sink with matching faucet and semi-custom cabinetry. Semi-custom cabinets are customizable, with versatile sizing and door front options.
Don't dismiss more subtle gray hues when planning your kitchen remodel. A soft dove-gray color palette can create a tranquil environment and unify the space better than a medley of hues. The Fresh Preserving kitchen at Jarden Home Brands streamlined a once-quaint kitchen by exchanging mahogany-hued wooden cabinets, mint walls, and a mismatched tile backsplash for classic gray cabinets, creamy marble countertops, and a white subway tile backsplash. 
In a charming Paris apartment, an open-concept kitchen and dining area is outfitted with 17th-century French chairs, a Napoleon III chandelier, along with a backsplash featuring 18th-century Portuguese tile. The custom French oak boiseries and cabinets are in the style of the 18th century. The kitchen's flooring is antique oak and the fireplace is original to the apartment.

When designing your new kitchen, consider creative ways to transform traditional pieces, like cabinets, into something functional and unique. For example, a standalone hutch made from Martha Stewart Living PureStyle cabinetry can not only serve as storage, but also transform into a handy reminder station with the addition of dry-erase board inserts.
Updating your kitchen backsplash is one of the easiest and cost-effective ways to give a new look to your old kitchen. It is also the first area that should get your attention when renovating your kitchen because a) no renovation is complete without a new Backsplash and b) it is the most used/abused area of the kitchen. From spilled food to hot oil splashes, the backsplash takes it all and complains little.
When homeowners remodel a kitchen, the impulse is often to upgrade all old appliances and eschew antiques for a thoroughly modern ambience. However, including upcycled pieces in excellent condition is environmentally friendly and adds warmth to a sterile space.The owners of this beloved 1843 Maplewood, New Jersey, home paid homage to the building's origins with a 19th-century cast-iron stove base and a school laboratory's spacious sink. 
While we pay a lot of attention to the paint we use in the house, the kitchen often tends to get ignored. Also, while the rest of the house may not need a repaint anytime soon, the walls of the kitchen undergo a lot of abuse. Smoke, water, oil and the general traffic in the kitchen can begin to reflect on its walls very soon. When painting a kitchen, remember that you should give attention to how the new color will gel with the rest of the house and whether the texture you pick will withstand oil and heat. Unless you wish to get an extremely fine and detailed painting done to the house, going DIY will make it even more affordable and a great way to get your family and friends involved. This also ensures that you have complete control over the designs so get creative!
Be sure there are appropriate power sources for relocated or new appliances. Many people realize too late that they don’t have the right gas or electric lines, Richard says. Plumber Stuart McGroder also suggests measuring appliances to ensure that they fit comfortably into allocated spaces. “If a dishwasher is crammed in, it could push up against the hose and won’t drain properly,” Stuart says.
When designing your new kitchen, consider creative ways to transform traditional pieces, like cabinets, into something functional and unique. For example, a standalone hutch made from Martha Stewart Living PureStyle cabinetry can not only serve as storage, but also transform into a handy reminder station with the addition of dry-erase board inserts.

Ready to assemble (RTA) kitchen cabinets come in a flat pack along with all the hardware needed for assembly. One of the biggest advantages of RTA kitchen idea is that it saves you a substantial cost on labor charges thereby allowing you extra room to spend on quality products. At the bottom of the price list are medium density fiberboard (MDF). Also known as engineered wood, substrate, hardboard, etc., they are all made by pressing wood particles together at high temperature with glue. While being an affordable option, it’s durability is often compromised.
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