If you’re keeping your existing floor and replacing your cabinets, you may have to deal with gaps between the old floor and the new cabinets. Base cabinets are usually 24 in. deep, but toe-kick depths vary. Cabinet widths run in 3-in. increments from 6 in. to 48 in. If the new cabinets don’t fit the existing cabinet footprint, you’ll be left with gaps. Be sure the total width of the new cabinets matches the overall width of the ones you’re replacing. Hide gaps smaller than 3/4 in. with molding.


Gone are the days when the sight of your cutlery in the open would invite a frown from the visiting guests — in fact, more and more people are opening up to the idea of open shelving. If you are looking to contrast your new kitchen from the old one (or your grandma’s) and add a sense of ‘largeness’ to your space, you should definitely try open shelving.
When updating your kitchen backsplash, consider whether you want to incorporate new changes to the material or re-do the existing design. If you are short on time and money, consider a simple coat of paint. This way, you can incorporate a variety of styles depending on your existing material or simply add a shade. If you are artistically inclined, use a stencil to create a design in a secondary accent color. Different kitchen backsplash ideas might be enough if you can’t afford a complete renovation.

While new paint will revitalize your kitchen, this will also be a good time to consider changing your hardware in the kitchen. While cabinets can last a really long time, the same cannot be said about kitchen hardware. As a general rule, metal works best for hardware for the simple reason that it is, well, metal. It is durable, sturdy and resistant to minor bumps and knocks. Within metal, however, you have a lot of choices: nickel and brass have a timeless appeal while steel is sleeker and more contemporary.
If you want more counter and storage space, then adding a center island may be worth the cost. But an island can limit the number of people working in the kitchen, reduce traffic flow to one-way with no passing, and make for cramped quarters. Try out an island before committing to one. Slap together a full-scale model out of cardboard or plywood and live with it for a few days. Make sure you can open your stove and refrigerator doors. No space for an island? Consider a kitchen trolley instead.
Take advantage of unused areas in your kitchen. Toe-kick storage located beneath cabinet doors, for example, is a creative place to store items that aren't used on a daily basis, like serveware, linens, or a spare step ladder. Maximizing your kitchen's floor plan to find additional storage opportunities will also help keep your countertops free of clutter.

If natural elements improve your mood (and science says they do), bring the outdoors inside with lush tropical plants, rough-hewn wooden furniture, and eco-friendly accents.Choose cabinets made of reclaimed wood, expand your windows to encourage greater plant growth, and invest in a lighting fixture that merely supplements the sun's rays as opposed to overshadowing them. 
To combine task lights with cost-friendliness, we suggest going the LED ceiling lights route. Besides being eco-friendly, these lights save a lot of dollars on electricity bills. You can bring out the wow factor with these lights too if you go for pendant lights above your kitchen island or dining area. For ambient use, chandeliers or even new-age track lighting can be used. Make sure to install dimmers if you plan to spend some time eating dinners with your loved one in the dining area. Basically, whatever your budget or use: If you are looking to take your kitchen to the next level, it’s time to hang some new lights!
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