Revitalizing and renovating a kitchen can be a tricky affair: not only do you have to decide what you must change, but you must also decide where to best spend your money. And dollar for dollar, new cabinet doors are one of the best investments. The reasons are simple: every day, your cabinet doors are opened a number of times and over a period, they suffer wear and tear. Even if the doors may not ‘look’ old, the hinges, for example, tend to get loose.
If a total kitchen transformation is what you’re after, it’s time to redo your flooring. Many choices are available nowadays. And if you’re looking for a durable, easy-to-clean option and love the traditional appeal of hardwood, consider a wood-look alternative such as vinyl or this glazed ceramic tile, which you can also use on the wall as a rustic backsplash.
While the material you chose will, of course, depend on your personal needs, preferences, and budget, you can always save costs by doing it yourself instead of hiring a professional. The Internet has many videos on going the DIY route but remember, do it only if you have prior experience of knocking down existing design and relating a new design. DIY is good only for people who know their stuff; for others, it can turn out to be extremely time consuming and worse, a half-baked project.
Be sure there are appropriate power sources for relocated or new appliances. Many people realize too late that they don’t have the right gas or electric lines, Richard says. Plumber Stuart McGroder also suggests measuring appliances to ensure that they fit comfortably into allocated spaces. “If a dishwasher is crammed in, it could push up against the hose and won’t drain properly,” Stuart says.
In the galley kitchen of a bohemian family home, the kitchen's range and microwave are by Wolf, the refrigerator is by Sub-Zero, the custom hood is by Vent-a-Hood and the countertop is Calacatta Gold marble. Hans Wegner chairs, purchased at auction, accompany a table by Eero Saarinen from Design Within Reach. The vintage pendant light is by Max Ingrand for FontanaArte.
Fabric impresario John Robshaw's Connecticut country house is quaint and colorful. Just because the kitchen is petite doesn't mean it is any less full of life. The kitchen’s settee is by Richard Wrightman, the sink fittings are by Newport Brass, the ceiling lights are by Restoration Hardware, the countertops are marble, and the custom dhurrie is by Robshaw. The walls are painted in Rose Quartz and the cabinetry in Starry Night, both by Benjamin Moore.
If you’re keeping your existing floor and replacing your cabinets, you may have to deal with gaps between the old floor and the new cabinets. Base cabinets are usually 24 in. deep, but toe-kick depths vary. Cabinet widths run in 3-in. increments from 6 in. to 48 in. If the new cabinets don’t fit the existing cabinet footprint, you’ll be left with gaps. Be sure the total width of the new cabinets matches the overall width of the ones you’re replacing. Hide gaps smaller than 3/4 in. with molding.
Don't dismiss more subtle gray hues when planning your kitchen remodel. A soft dove-gray color palette can create a tranquil environment and unify the space better than a medley of hues. The Fresh Preserving kitchen at Jarden Home Brands streamlined a once-quaint kitchen by exchanging mahogany-hued wooden cabinets, mint walls, and a mismatched tile backsplash for classic gray cabinets, creamy marble countertops, and a white subway tile backsplash. 

Pull-down racks give you instant access to kitchen essentials without the clutter of spice racks or knife holders. When the cooking is done, the rack swings up against the underside of the cabinet. You can buy ready-made racks or buy a pair of hinges and make your own wooden rack to hold knives, spices or other small items that take up counter space. You’ll find a variety of racks and hardware at ikea.com, wwhardware.com and other online retailers.
Be sure there are appropriate power sources for relocated or new appliances. Many people realize too late that they don’t have the right gas or electric lines, Richard says. Plumber Stuart McGroder also suggests measuring appliances to ensure that they fit comfortably into allocated spaces. “If a dishwasher is crammed in, it could push up against the hose and won’t drain properly,” Stuart says.
If they’re quality wood and still in good working order, you’re in luck. This is one of the first things I check when sizing up a pre-remodel kitchen, since cabinet frames are the most expensive component of the entire space.  It’s quite simple to give salvageable cabinets a face lift. Three common ways to repurpose and save thousands include: adding new doors and drawer fronts, re-laminating fronts and sides, or repainting – which leads us to......Don’t Just Paint – Spray Paint. Have all the cabinets cleaned and lightly sanded, then have a painter come in to spray them. Don’t try to DIY this one; a couple of cans of spray paint from the hardware store just won’t do the trick. A professional spray job can make ugly cabinets look factory-new. And you can’t get the same look by painting or rolling the cabinets yourself.
If you want more counter and storage space, then adding a center island may be worth the cost. But an island can limit the number of people working in the kitchen, reduce traffic flow to one-way with no passing, and make for cramped quarters. Try out an island before committing to one. Slap together a full-scale model out of cardboard or plywood and live with it for a few days. Make sure you can open your stove and refrigerator doors. No space for an island? Consider a kitchen trolley instead.
If you’re getting new cabinets but want to keep your old refrigerator, leave enough space between cabinets so you can replace your fridge with a wider model later. (Most refrigerators are 32 to 36 in. wide.) Install filler strips or panels to fill up the extra space. You can install shelving between the panels over the top of the fridge or install top cabinets. Order the filler strips and panels with your cabinets so they match.
Amanda Seyfried's Catskills retreat, designed by General Assembly, is a stylish (and slightly quieter) alternative to Hamptons living. Inside the kitchen, perfect for entertaining despite the limited square-footage, the range and hood are by Wolf, the Whitehaus sink is fitted with a Kallista faucet, and the backsplash is of tiles by Heath Ceramics. The island has a countertop of Caesarstone, the pairs of pendant lights are by Tom Dixon, and the cabinets are painted in Aganthus Green by Benjamin Moore.
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