The kitchen work triangle is the area where most tasks are performed in your kitchen. This usually involves the refrigerator, the stove, and the sink. The spacing of these items is essential, as you’ll spend a lot of time moving back and forth between these three focal points. Our kitchen designers will help you find the optimal location for your work triangle. We will design your kitchen to be functional to fit your specific needs.
In a charming Paris apartment, an open-concept kitchen and dining area is outfitted with 17th-century French chairs, a Napoleon III chandelier, along with a backsplash featuring 18th-century Portuguese tile. The custom French oak boiseries and cabinets are in the style of the 18th century. The kitchen's flooring is antique oak and the fireplace is original to the apartment.

After you and one of our kitchen designers have selected from all the great products our stores have to offer, don’t forget: The Home Depot’s high-quality contractors can do it for you! While other kitchen remodeling companies in your area may be able to get the job done, our installers and contractors will get the job done right and have the nation’s largest home improvement retailer supporting them every step of the way. Be sure to ask your in-store designer how to take the next step in your kitchen remodel process with our installation services.
Optimize your kitchen floor plan for food prep and entertaining by rethinking the layout. Simply switching the location of your refrigerator, cabinets, and dishwasher could increase counter space and allow for a better traffic flow through the room. Kristin Jackson, the blogging virtuoso behind The Hunted Interior, significantly augmented her kitchen storage by redistributing her appliances and adopting an open shelving design. With fewer tall, imposing cabinets and extended countertop space, Kristin's revamped kitchen is a lesson in less-is-more design. 
While a significant expense for most homeowners, renovating your kitchen is also an investment that can last you for years to come and may even increase the overall value of your home. Therefore, there are a few tips you'll want to keep in mind before you embark on your renovation journey—as well as a number of common mistakes you'll want to try and avoid. Doing so will help make your time, effort, and money well worth it. 

In a charming Paris apartment, an open-concept kitchen and dining area is outfitted with 17th-century French chairs, a Napoleon III chandelier, along with a backsplash featuring 18th-century Portuguese tile. The custom French oak boiseries and cabinets are in the style of the 18th century. The kitchen's flooring is antique oak and the fireplace is original to the apartment.

Your kitchen is the center of your home, where good food and good times come together. Whether you’re making a quick breakfast or cooking a holiday dinner, your kitchen should match your needs. Let us help you with your kitchen upgrade. From cabinetry to flooring, we do it all. If your kitchen just needs to be refreshed or if it needs a total makeover, we have all the products and remodeling services needed to get your kitchen in the best shape possible. Talk to an in-store kitchen designer today or give us a call to start your consultation with The Home Depot!
Don't place limitations on your color palette. While natural earth tones work well in some homes, playful pastels pair elegantly with other spaces.Homeowners Curtis and Jennie Hemmert began their kitchen remodel with a foundation of chestnut-hued wooden cabinets that begged for a coat of color. Semigloss seafoam-hued paint lends the Hemmerts' homey kitchen more whimsy and visually opens the space. 
Ready to assemble (RTA) kitchen cabinets come in a flat pack along with all the hardware needed for assembly. One of the biggest advantages of RTA kitchen idea is that it saves you a substantial cost on labor charges thereby allowing you extra room to spend on quality products. At the bottom of the price list are medium density fiberboard (MDF). Also known as engineered wood, substrate, hardboard, etc., they are all made by pressing wood particles together at high temperature with glue. While being an affordable option, it’s durability is often compromised.
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