When it comes to flooring ideas, hardwood is the most well-known standard and material. Within hardwood, however, there are a lot of variations and differences. The most common form of hardwood flooring came in thick planks of solid timber. Solid hardwood is milled from a single piece of wood and hence a completely natural material. It is more adept at handling temperature and humidity changes.
Our kitchen remodeling expertise extends to most areas in the DFW Metroplex: Dallas, Northwood Hills, Lakewood, Lake Highlands, Park Cities (Highland Park, University Park), Greenway Parks, Bluffview, Uptown, Downtown Dallas, M Streets and Preston Hollow. And in these surrounding cities: Coppell, Plano, Richardson, Addison, Carrollton, Irving and Farmers Branch.
For example, if you plan to serve snacks or use this space for wine sessions, leave proper legroom and surface area for each person. About 24 inches of width might be enough for each person. Consider leaving 9 to 13 inches of clearance between your knees and the bottom of the counter for the necessary legroom. While designing, match the counter height with the seating you use. Customizing your island can make it more user-friendly and diverse without adding costs, For example, if your kitchen island also doubles as a workspace, consider adding electrical outlets to make sure people can charge their phones or plug in a speaker. There a number of kitchen island ideas that can get you moving.
You can begin planning for your kitchen remodel by knowing a rough estimate of where your money will be spent. For a full kitchen renovation, 1/3 of your budget will go to cabinetry, 1/3 will be spent on installation, and the remaining 1/3 is allocated to finishing touches. Finishing touches could be appliances, lighting, faucets, sinks, plumbing, backsplash, countertops, or flooring. Keeping these in mind, you’ll be able to balance your budget and more easily plan your project. For additional details on the cost of remodeling a kitchen, please visit our cost guide.

Amanda Seyfried's Catskills retreat, designed by General Assembly, is a stylish (and slightly quieter) alternative to Hamptons living. Inside the kitchen, perfect for entertaining despite the limited square-footage, the range and hood are by Wolf, the Whitehaus sink is fitted with a Kallista faucet, and the backsplash is of tiles by Heath Ceramics. The island has a countertop of Caesarstone, the pairs of pendant lights are by Tom Dixon, and the cabinets are painted in Aganthus Green by Benjamin Moore.


We're really digging the alternating black and gray stained wood cabinets in this deVOL kitchen. The varied tones (plus texture) adds interest to a neutral space. The sandy beige walls keep things neutral but warms thing a little more than a crisp white or super light gray. The shearling chair cover warms up, too, and the interior window creates flow and spreads the light.
"The kitchen is another example of applying real design ingenuity to small dimensions," Refinery29 founder Christine Barberich says of her Brooklyn Heights space. "My husband found the best appliances he could that were all smaller in scale, so nothing felt out of proportion. I love the XO relief tiles that create the white backsplash. They’re just fun because you might not notice the pattern until you’re up close. We had the concrete countertop made in Bay Ridge by this three-generation family of concrete designers. We loved the idea of having this major industrial moment right in the middle of the apartment and it really does serve as an entertaining area, workspace for cooking, or flower arranging. It’s unexpected in its brutalist vibe against the white backdrop and softer, colored details."
For example, if you plan to serve snacks or use this space for wine sessions, leave proper legroom and surface area for each person. About 24 inches of width might be enough for each person. Consider leaving 9 to 13 inches of clearance between your knees and the bottom of the counter for the necessary legroom. While designing, match the counter height with the seating you use. Customizing your island can make it more user-friendly and diverse without adding costs, For example, if your kitchen island also doubles as a workspace, consider adding electrical outlets to make sure people can charge their phones or plug in a speaker. There a number of kitchen island ideas that can get you moving.
Gone are the days when the sight of your cutlery in the open would invite a frown from the visiting guests — in fact, more and more people are opening up to the idea of open shelving. If you are looking to contrast your new kitchen from the old one (or your grandma’s) and add a sense of ‘largeness’ to your space, you should definitely try open shelving.
If you’re keeping your existing floor and replacing your cabinets, you may have to deal with gaps between the old floor and the new cabinets. Base cabinets are usually 24 in. deep, but toe-kick depths vary. Cabinet widths run in 3-in. increments from 6 in. to 48 in. If the new cabinets don’t fit the existing cabinet footprint, you’ll be left with gaps. Be sure the total width of the new cabinets matches the overall width of the ones you’re replacing. Hide gaps smaller than 3/4 in. with molding.

Homeowners know best which items they need to store, and no one understands how to organize said items quite like Martha Stewart. When the culinary queen remodeled her own Maple Avenue kitchen, orderliness was a top priority.Make like Martha by remodeling your kitchen with imaginative, original storage ideas specific to your needs, such as pegged drawers to corral plates and drawer dividers for cutlery. 


Task Lighting: Under-cabinet lighting should be on your must-do list, since cabinets create such dark work areas. And since you’re remodeling, there won’t be a better time to hard-wire your lights. (Here’s more about under-cabinet lights.) Plan for at least two fixtures per task area to eliminate shadows. Pendant lights are good for islands and other counters without low cabinets. Recessed lights and track lights work well over sinks and general prep areas with no cabinets overhead.

The one important reason why you should choose new cabinet doors because if you want to keep your costs low, you can always consider buying ready-to-use doors which are available in various colors, material and texture. For ease of usage and low maintenance, you can always consider plywood/MDF. However, if you can afford to spend a little more, proper wood like dark cherry wood cabinets would be a lovely option. If you are feeling eccentric and eclectic at the same time (well done, you!) then you can even consider getting rid of cabinet doors completely and instead opt for an open shelf design. That choice, however, will require you to get new cabinets that are more suited to open-frame designs.
Don't place limitations on your color palette. While natural earth tones work well in some homes, playful pastels pair elegantly with other spaces.Homeowners Curtis and Jennie Hemmert began their kitchen remodel with a foundation of chestnut-hued wooden cabinets that begged for a coat of color. Semigloss seafoam-hued paint lends the Hemmerts' homey kitchen more whimsy and visually opens the space. 
Home remodeling superstores carry a great selection of door hardware.  Choose knobs and pulls that complement your architectural style, and don’t cut corners. This is what I call a brooch – an added touch that makes the whole room work! Also, remove and replace any old painted-over hinges with shiny new ones. It is time consuming, but very inexpensive. And it makes a huge difference.
Don't dismiss more subtle gray hues when planning your kitchen remodel. A soft dove-gray color palette can create a tranquil environment and unify the space better than a medley of hues. The Fresh Preserving kitchen at Jarden Home Brands streamlined a once-quaint kitchen by exchanging mahogany-hued wooden cabinets, mint walls, and a mismatched tile backsplash for classic gray cabinets, creamy marble countertops, and a white subway tile backsplash. 

Gone are the days when the sight of your cutlery in the open would invite a frown from the visiting guests — in fact, more and more people are opening up to the idea of open shelving. If you are looking to contrast your new kitchen from the old one (or your grandma’s) and add a sense of ‘largeness’ to your space, you should definitely try open shelving.
While new paint will revitalize your kitchen, this will also be a good time to consider changing your hardware in the kitchen. While cabinets can last a really long time, the same cannot be said about kitchen hardware. As a general rule, metal works best for hardware for the simple reason that it is, well, metal. It is durable, sturdy and resistant to minor bumps and knocks. Within metal, however, you have a lot of choices: nickel and brass have a timeless appeal while steel is sleeker and more contemporary.
Task Lighting: Under-cabinet lighting should be on your must-do list, since cabinets create such dark work areas. And since you’re remodeling, there won’t be a better time to hard-wire your lights. (Here’s more about under-cabinet lights.) Plan for at least two fixtures per task area to eliminate shadows. Pendant lights are good for islands and other counters without low cabinets. Recessed lights and track lights work well over sinks and general prep areas with no cabinets overhead.
In general, remember the latest appliances are not only more efficient, but they are also more ‘beautiful’ to look at. That said, do not prioritize form over function. Remember, appliances are long-term investments. If you are planning to sell the property, check with local property agents to confirm whether investing in new appliances will fetch you a higher price for the property. Of course, if you plan to continue staying at the house, then the investments made in appliances will improve the kitchen’s efficiency and performance.
Remodeling your kitchen is the perfect opportunity to create a design that’s based on your individual needs. Focus on who will be using the kitchen most and how many people will be working in the space at one time. You’ll want to ensure you have room to work and move around as needed, so consider the work triangle in your new layout. You’ll also want to think about a dining area, how often you entertain, and what a kitchen with guests would look like. Our team of kitchen designers can develop a variety of options to ensure your new kitchen perfectly fits your lifestyle.
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