The time it takes to remodel your kitchen depends on the size of your project, the amount of work needed, and product lead times. The process can take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, averaging 2-3 weeks for a small project and 4-12 weeks for a larger, more complex project. These time estimates include the ordering and delivery of your custom products. During your site verification, ask our qualified kitchen contractor how long your project should take.
If you want to use your kitchen as an office, make it part of the remodel. You don’t need a lot of space. A small seating area with a computer station is often adequate. During the remodel, add Internet access and outlets for plugging in your computer equipment (visit familyhandyman.com and search for “add outlets”). Also add storage space like shelving or a recessed wall cabinet so your paperwork won’t get lost or create a mess.
There are several elements in your kitchen with storage capabilities. Most homeowners start with their cabinets. If you need new cabinets, now is the time to update storage capacity with drawer inserts, roll-out trays or more shelves. You can also choose a closed cabinet design, a glass face to display the items in the cabinets, or even have open shelving.
A small kitchen requires design accents that serve multiple functions simultaneously while occupying minimal space. A master multitasker, the average kitchen island can provide additional dining space, a platform for food preparation, and significant storage in compact quarters.To ensure optimal utility, allow three to four feet of vacant space between each of an island's sides and neighboring surfaces. 
Ready to assemble (RTA) kitchen cabinets come in a flat pack along with all the hardware needed for assembly. One of the biggest advantages of RTA kitchen idea is that it saves you a substantial cost on labor charges thereby allowing you extra room to spend on quality products. At the bottom of the price list are medium density fiberboard (MDF). Also known as engineered wood, substrate, hardboard, etc., they are all made by pressing wood particles together at high temperature with glue. While being an affordable option, it’s durability is often compromised.
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