If you’re getting new cabinets but want to keep your old refrigerator, leave enough space between cabinets so you can replace your fridge with a wider model later. (Most refrigerators are 32 to 36 in. wide.) Install filler strips or panels to fill up the extra space. You can install shelving between the panels over the top of the fridge or install top cabinets. Order the filler strips and panels with your cabinets so they match.
The one important reason why you should choose new cabinet doors because if you want to keep your costs low, you can always consider buying ready-to-use doors which are available in various colors, material and texture. For ease of usage and low maintenance, you can always consider plywood/MDF. However, if you can afford to spend a little more, proper wood like dark cherry wood cabinets would be a lovely option. If you are feeling eccentric and eclectic at the same time (well done, you!) then you can even consider getting rid of cabinet doors completely and instead opt for an open shelf design. That choice, however, will require you to get new cabinets that are more suited to open-frame designs.
Fabric impresario John Robshaw's Connecticut country house is quaint and colorful. Just because the kitchen is petite doesn't mean it is any less full of life. The kitchen’s settee is by Richard Wrightman, the sink fittings are by Newport Brass, the ceiling lights are by Restoration Hardware, the countertops are marble, and the custom dhurrie is by Robshaw. The walls are painted in Rose Quartz and the cabinetry in Starry Night, both by Benjamin Moore.
In a charming Paris apartment, an open-concept kitchen and dining area is outfitted with 17th-century French chairs, a Napoleon III chandelier, along with a backsplash featuring 18th-century Portuguese tile. The custom French oak boiseries and cabinets are in the style of the 18th century. The kitchen's flooring is antique oak and the fireplace is original to the apartment.

Revitalizing and renovating a kitchen can be a tricky affair: not only do you have to decide what you must change, but you must also decide where to best spend your money. And dollar for dollar, new cabinet doors are one of the best investments. The reasons are simple: every day, your cabinet doors are opened a number of times and over a period, they suffer wear and tear. Even if the doors may not ‘look’ old, the hinges, for example, tend to get loose.
While a significant expense for most homeowners, renovating your kitchen is also an investment that can last you for years to come and may even increase the overall value of your home. Therefore, there are a few tips you'll want to keep in mind before you embark on your renovation journey—as well as a number of common mistakes you'll want to try and avoid. Doing so will help make your time, effort, and money well worth it. 
Let’s clear out one thing right at the beginning: whether you live with a family or by yourself, the kitchen is the busiest space in a house. From the coffee you whip up to get out of that agonizingly-wonderful slumber every morning to the last glass of water you sip every night, the kitchen remains at the center of your home. It is perfectly understandable as to why just like life, kitchen design also needs a breath of fresh air, or simply, a coat of fresh paint.
If you’re keeping your existing floor and replacing your cabinets, you may have to deal with gaps between the old floor and the new cabinets. Base cabinets are usually 24 in. deep, but toe-kick depths vary. Cabinet widths run in 3-in. increments from 6 in. to 48 in. If the new cabinets don’t fit the existing cabinet footprint, you’ll be left with gaps. Be sure the total width of the new cabinets matches the overall width of the ones you’re replacing. Hide gaps smaller than 3/4 in. with molding.

Be sure there are appropriate power sources for relocated or new appliances. Many people realize too late that they don’t have the right gas or electric lines, Richard says. Plumber Stuart McGroder also suggests measuring appliances to ensure that they fit comfortably into allocated spaces. “If a dishwasher is crammed in, it could push up against the hose and won’t drain properly,” Stuart says.
There's a lot to love about this kitchen designed by Arent & Pyke, but we're particularly impressed by the careful, asymmetrical balance happening here. The hood leans to the right of the room, as do the bar stools, which is subtlety reflected in the cream lumbar pillow camouflaging into the sofa. Meanwhile, the linear floating shelf in line with the hood as well as the light fixture, island counter, and sofa form a soothing sense of symmetry.
If you do have the budget to rearrange appliances, make sure to keep your floor plan in mind. Does it follow the natural triangular traffic pattern between the refrigerator, stove, and oven? Is the dishwasher next to the sink? It should be, because otherwise, you create a mess every time you walk across the room with a dripping dish in your hand. To save money, I once put a dishwasher in the counter opposite the sink – and as a result, I cleaned up drips on the floor for years.
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